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Tue. Jun 18th, 2024

The Metro Council is working to find solutions to ongoing burglaries in East Louisville

By meerna Jun12,2024

TONIGHT. METRO COUNCILORS SAY THEY ARE WORKING TO FIND A SOLUTION TO CAR THEFTS AND BURGLARIES IN EAST LOUISVILLE. WLKY IS MADISON ELLIOTT TALKED TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL AND PEOPLE LIVING IN THE AREA ABOUT THE STEPS THEY TAKE TO NOT BECOME A VICTIM. THE POLICE SAY THAT SUCH CRIMES ARE USUALLY RANDOM CRIMES. THEY SAY THAT THIEVES WILL COME TO THE CAR, PICK OUT THE DOOR, AND USE THE HANDLE. IF IT IS OPEN THEY WILL COME INSIDE. BUT IF IT IS CLOSED THEY WILL MOVE ON. RING CAMERA VIDEO FROM NEIGHBORS IN GLENVIEW SPRINGS SHOWS THIEVES APPROACHING A CAR, PULLING THE HANDLE AND LEAVING. WHEN THEY SEE IT’S CLOSED. CAR BURGLARIES AND ATTEMPTED CAR BURGLARIES ARE BECOMING SUCH A PROBLEM IN EAST LOUISVILLE, SAYS PAUL KNOTT. A NEIGHBOR WATCH WAS CREATED IN HIS GLENVIEW SPRINGS COMMUNITY. WE SEE IT. I FEEL THAT DEFINITELY EVERY MONTH, IF NOT EVERY OTHER WEEK OR SOMETIMES EVEN EVERY WEEK, THEY USED THE HOA FEES TO INSTALL FLOCK CAMERAS IN THE HOPE THAT THEY WOULD HELP CATCH THE THIEVES. IT’S EVEN MORE FRUSTRATING AS YOU GET MORE INVOLVED, YOU START PUT THINGS AWAY AND NOTICE WHAT THE LEVEL OF POLICE PRESENCE IS. We reached out to two metro councilors who represented districts in East Louisville, Councilman Scott Reed and Council President Marcus Winkler. THEY BOTH POINTED out officer shortages as ONE PROBLEM. REED SAYS ANY OFFICIAL THE CITY CAN HIRE WILL HELP, BUT WINKLER SAYS THEY HAVE TO KEEP THE OFFICERS ALSO. WE SEE OUR CONSUMPTION NUMBER HAS BEEN CUTTED IN HALF, BASICALLY OVER THE LAST SIX MONTHS, SO, YOU KNOW, CERTAINLY GETTING PEOPLE IN THE DOOR IS ONE PART OF THE PUZZLE, BUT MAKE SURE THEY DON’T LEAVE THE OTHER DOOR JUST CRITICAL. WINKLER SAYS THE COUNCIL IS IN CONSTANT CONTACT WITH LMPD, BUT THERE IS LITTLE THE COUNCIL CAN DO TO INCREASE PENALTIES IN CASES WHERE WE GO IN, PUBLIC SAFETY IS OUR NUMBER ONE PRIORITY. AND SO WE ARE MAKE SURE THAT, YOU KNOW, WE FUND LMPD SO THAT WE GET BACK TO FULL STRENGTH IN LMPD. REED SAYS THEY ARE LOOKING AT OTHER OPTIONS, INCLUDING LAPD’S CHASE POLICY AND TRYING TO KEEP CRIMINALS BEHIND BARS LONGER, NOT GET OUT QUICKLY. POLICE SAY YOUTH ARE INVOLVED IN MANY CASES AND WINKLER BELIEVES WORKING WITH YOUTH IS PART OF THE SOLUTION. BUT NOW THE PROBLEM IS NOT DEEPER THAN YOUTH PROGRAMS OR ADDING MORE OFFICIALS. YOU MUST CREATE EXAMPLES OUT OF PEOPLE AND YOU MUST HOLD PEOPLE ACCOUNTABLE. THIS IS WHAT WE MISS. MADISON ELLIOTT WLKY NEWS AND THE PROPOSED LOUISVILLE METRO BUDGET WILL BE VOTED NEXT THURSDAY WHICH INCLUDES

The Metro Council is working to find solutions to car thefts and burglaries in East Louisville

Metro Council members say they are working to find solutions to ongoing car thefts and burglaries in East Louisville. Councilman Scott Reed, who represents East Louisville Metro Council District 16, says they are exploring options. “We are in the middle of the budget process, so I am asking for any ideas we can fund as well as any support we can provide to help hire and train more officers,” he said in response. “We discussed issues such as the police pursuit policy and its origins, the need to potentially enforce ordinances prohibiting the use of masks in public spaces, and, most importantly, the need for judges to no longer release people arrested for crimes as quickly as possible.” Reed says any officer the city can hire will help with LMPD’s ongoing officer shortage. “Any officer we can hire will help improve the situation and give our department more flexibility in responding to the wide range of crimes that occur,” he said vehicles is important, many of these and other crimes are interconnected – for example, gun violence, theft, drugs and other forms of crime are often interconnected, and if we can make progress on one, we will make progress on the others.” Council Chairman Markus Winkler says detaining the officers is another piece of the puzzle. “But we see that the number of attrition rates has halved in the last six months, so certainly inviting people in is one piece of the puzzle, but making sure they don’t go out the other door is crucial.” he said. East Louisville resident Paul Knopf heads the neighborhood watch in Glenview Springs, where he says the problem is getting worse. “We see it, I feel like it’s definitely every month, if not every other week, sometimes even every week,” he said. He says police presence is limited due to shortages. While he says better pay is important, it’s not just that. “You can’t spend a bigger salary on this,” he said. “In the end, it all comes down to job satisfaction,” he added. Although not exclusively, LMPD confirms that many young people are involved in such matters. Knopf says young people need to be held accountable. “We need to deal with the minors who are committing all these acts,” he said. “You have to create examples out of people and hold people accountable, that’s what we’re missing,” he added. The Metro Council will vote to adopt the 2024-2025 budget on Thursday, June 20 at 6 p.m. during its regularly scheduled meeting, during which a proposal to increase funding for LMPD will be proposed.

Metro Council members say they are working to find solutions to the frequent car thefts and break-ins in East Louisville.

Councilman Scott Reed, who represents East Louisville Metro Council District 16, says they are exploring options.

“We are in the middle of the budget process, so I am asking for any ideas we can fund as well as any support we can provide to help hire and train more officers,” he said in response. “We discussed issues such as the police pursuit policy and its origins, the need to potentially enforce ordinances prohibiting the use of masks in public spaces, and, most importantly, the need for judges to no longer release people arrested for crimes as quickly as they could.”

Reed says that with LMPD’s ongoing officer shortage, any officer the city can hire will help.

“Every officer we can hire will help improve the situation and give our department greater flexibility in responding to the wide range of crimes that occur,” he said. “While vehicle theft is important, many of these and other crimes are interconnected – for example, gun violence, theft, drugs and other forms of crime are often interconnected, and if we can make progress on one, we will make progress in the rest as well.”

Council Chairman Markus Winkler says detaining the officers is another piece of the puzzle.

“But we can see that the number of attrition rates has halved in the last six months, so certainly inviting people in is one piece of the puzzle, but making sure they don’t go out the other door is crucial.” he said.

East Louisville resident Paul Knopf heads the neighborhood watch in Glenview Springs, where he says the problem is getting worse.

“We see it, I feel like, definitely every month, if not every other week, sometimes even every week,” he said

He says police presence is limited due to shortages.

While he says better pay is important, it’s not just that.

“You can’t spend a bigger salary on this,” he said.

“In the end, it all comes down to job satisfaction,” he added.

Although not exclusively, LMPD confirms that many young people are involved in these cases.

Knopf says young people need to be held accountable.

“We need to deal with the minors who are committing all these acts,” he said.

“You have to create examples out of people and hold people accountable, that’s what we’re missing,” he added.

The Metro Council will vote to adopt the 2024-2025 budget on Thursday, June 20 at 6 p.m. during its regularly scheduled meeting, during which a proposal to increase funding for LMPD will be proposed.

By meerna

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