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Fri. Jul 19th, 2024

Celebrating Pride in Northern Kentucky

By meerna Jun18,2024
Celebrating Pride in Northern Kentucky

COVINGTON, Ky. — While Northern Kentucky has been a center of progress and integration, the woman who played a big role in achieving that status says there is still work to be done.


What you need to know

  • Covington was the third Kentucky city to pass a fairness ordinance and the first to ban conversion therapy for minors
  • Northern Kentucky currently has half of all Kentucky cities with integrity ordinances
  • Tens of thousands of people showed up for the Pride festival in northern Kentucky on June 2
  • NKY Pride president Bonnie Meyer said she thinks support for her community is stronger than ever

As president and co-founder of the NKY Pride Center, Bonnie Meyer has been trying to help the LGBTQ community thrive for 13 years.

She said she was proud of what she and her fellow volunteers had accomplished and yet; she said they had to keep pushing.

“During the last legislative session, we had a lot of attacks on our LGBTQIA+ community in Frankfort,” Meyer said. “In some ways, we have some of the worst anti-LGBTQIA+ laws in the country right now here in Kentucky, but we also have some really thriving communities. The city of Covington has been incredibly supportive.”

Covington was the third Kentucky city to pass a fairness ordinance and the first to ban conversion therapy for minors.

“They really encouraged other cities in northern Kentucky to pass fairness ordinances as well,” Meyer said. “It teaches us that we matter here, this expression of support from the city.”

Meyer said Northern Kentucky now has half of all Kentucky cities with fairness ordinances.

As an education professor, Meyer’s main focus as Northern Kentucky Pride director is schools, especially supporting what she said is transgender youth.

Center launches youth leadership council.

“When we are so limited in how we talk about identity in our schools and how we can or cannot discuss certain topics,” she said. “I think it’s always important to remember that pride comes from an uprising.”

Tens of thousands of people showed up for a pride festival in northern Kentucky on June 2. Meyer said support for her community is stronger than ever.

“Statistics show that more people are away from home than ever before. And that more people know people from the LGBTQIA+ community than ever before,” she said.

Meyer said she wants to continue to lead this community and improve the lives of its residents. Always been like that.

“I have a calling to do everything I can to make the world a better place. I experienced discrimination due to sexual orientation,” she said. “Because of my experiences, I can go out there and be an active advocate.”

Meyer said young professionals want to live in inclusive communities. She said LGBTQ support is not only the right thing to do, but can help the community grow.

Meyer said the pride center also partners with Transform Cincy, a nonprofit organization that will set up pop-up closets once a month to help distribute clothes to transgender youth in the community.

By meerna

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